credit grants

How Credit Grants Can Boost Employee Engagement

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As the job market continues to heat up, companies need to know what people want to attract talent. Today’s workforce expects companies to lead with purpose, and one in three job seekers say it’s extremely important that their organization has a positive impact on communities. Having a robust giving program helps build a purpose-driven culture that will encourage people to come and stay.

One way to let employees know about your program is through credit grants. Credit grants are donation funds granted to employees that can be directed to the nonprofit(s) of their choice. Giving credits can be used as part of automated programs or as one-time gifts, and they’re a great way to grow program awareness, participation and impact! Giving credit grants to employees as part of your program shows them that you care about the causes they care about.

Infographic: 10 Ways to Use Credit Grants 

Credit grants are a great way to grow program participation and impact! Here are ten ideas on how to use them, and any of these can be tied to your giving campaigns.

Download the infographic➔

credit grants infographic cover

Here are some ideas on ways to use credit grants. 

  1. Give them to new hires at the time of onboarding. Typical amounts range from $20-$50, although some clients give $100 or more. Keep in mind that even a $25 giving credit will demonstrate your company’s commitment to a giving culture. As a bonus, your new employee will see how easy it is to donate and be more likely to donate in the future. 
  2. Send them to employees who have reached a work anniversary such as their 1st or 20th year.
  3. Run a competition and provide giving credits as prizes. One client runs a monthly incentive program/contest for employees to submit professional development. Those who do are entered into a raffle where Bright Funds credit grants are one of the prizes.
  4. Plan a charitable goods drive (food, toys, books, etc.) and award participants with giving credits.
  5. Enter all employees who have participated in the program this year into a raffle and issue credit grants to the winners! You could also limit the raffle to specific participation rates such as employees who have donated at least $100 or volunteered for 10 hours. In one case, a client sponsored a Giving Tuesday lunch for employees and held raffles throughout the day based on participation (e.g. one raffle for those who had recorded volunteer hours and another for for those who had made a donation). The raffle prizes were credit grants.
  6. Send them to employees who have not participated in the program this year – this is a good way to get them onto the platform.
  7. Distribute them to all employees. This will help get the word out and boost engagement at the same time! Many of our clients allocate credit grants for program launch, the holiday season or to align with a campaign such as Giving Tuesday
  8. Give a credit grant to employees who log their volunteer hours (or the most hours!) by the end of the year. One client awarded a $500 giving credit to each of the three employees that logged the most volunteer hours that year. 
  9. Celebrate employees who are program champions with a giving credit award.
  10. Create physical Bright Funds gift cards for credit grants that can be sent to employees. One client included it in the welcome package they sent to new hires.
  11. BONUS IDEA: One client who hit their matching goals in the prior year celebrated by giving all employees a $1,000 giving credit. 
  12. BONUS IDEA: One client wanted to generate awareness of their program but didn’t have a big budget. They gave a launch credit grant to a randomly selected employee.

Download the infographic “10 Ways to Use Credit Grants” to keep these ideas handy. 

Julie Yamamoto

Julie Yamamoto

Julie is a Content Strategist at Bright Funds. She works closely with clients to deliver compelling content that inspires action. Her work has been featured in several enterprise and nonprofit digital channels, as well as GreenBiz and American Forests. She is a trained Climate Reality leader with a passion for environmental topics (technology for good, sustainable business, forests and carbon markets, climate change, conservation and biodiversity). In the future, she hopes to start a nonprofit focused on harnessing creativity to protect nature.